« Europeans Thinking Outside the Sign | Main | Mayor Riley of Charleston, SC on Design of Greatness »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c03bb53ef00e5507192d48834

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Indiana Jones in Customer Service:

Comments

Stephen -- I'm sure that in your reading you also got a sense of preserving the core while being flexible. Building on values and having a compass are important even as we adapt to changing environments.

Joe -- you might take a look at some of the evolutionary reasons for deception of self and others. I came across an interesting book called "Why we Lie" that gets into that. Not to make excuses, but to understand some of the mechanisms built into our human wiring.

Valeria,

This type of issue is part of a four-part series I am developing on words versus action.

As I posted at FC: The tension is created when a company perpetuates the perception of a certain level of customer service, and then doesn't allow their front-line staff to deliver on the perception.

This is inherent in many areas of companies, and our personal lives: the dichotomy of 'what we talk about" versus our actions.

It doesn't have to be that way. Companies need to uphold their brand promise - from advertising, to product development to front-line service.

What a quest that would be!

Interesting post. I am currently reading a book that this post is similar too. Its about the Jesuit's ability to adapt and how they built a 450 year old company on just s few principles. Adaptability and engaging being one of them.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Advisory Boards


As seen on

Social

Marketing that makes business sense


Conversations


Book Reviews


Comment Policy and Social Guidelines

  • This is my blog and not a public space. Critical discourse is welcomed. However, inappropriate comments will be deleted. See my social guidelines for reference.

Disclaimer

  • The opinions blogged herein represent only those of Valeria Maltoni and do not reflect those of her employer, persons or companies mentioned herein, or anyone else.