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Charlie -- It was the President of NetApp, Tom Mendoza, who said that the key to risk taking is in how you handle failure. That was part of a live conversation I reported here a couple of months ago. You're spot on with your point.

Karen -- I am smiling broadly at your thoughtful comment. That is indeed what happens. Although processes are created to make things smoother and get everyone on the same page, they (the processes) need to serve the people, not the other way around. As for the people part of the equation, change is easier to talk about than it is to do. I would be very interested in seeing if anyone else wants to weigh in on this one. My observation is that often what makes us successful tends to keep us locked into place where we become very good at what worked. Some of the reasons are: rewards systems and perception of status that greatly reduce the appetite for risk.

The new generation, especially millennials, are placing a lot more value on collaboration. What do they think? If anyone is reading I hope they join in ;-)

Valeria

I love your comments on Creativity. Having worked for organizations in both the profit and not-for-profit sectors, I think there are two roadblocks to the implementation to great ideas: 1)People who claim they want change, but don't in the end 2) Process and rigid internal reporting systems.

Being a "creative" person (but also business-minded), I've often been in situations where I had an innovative (and realistic) solution to a business challenge, yet for some reason it fell on deaf ears. In some cases, I found out the people involved were not really risk-takers (although they claimed to be), and in others, the internal systems were so process-oriented that the idea died or became distorted before it even reached the upper echelons.

Does anyone have any ideas on how to overcome these obstacles, to be sure an idea gets implemented?

Great post. I also had a problem with execution. But the moment I learn how to face failures, the problem no longer become a big concern.

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