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Being pro-active. I didn't mention it, and I should have!

An IT firm creates a positive brand impression by not waiting for the client to call with a problem: they seek out the work. Engage in a conversation, chat to clients and even potential clients about their systems, networks and so on. Don't necessarily "sell" in these conversations; the idea is to help create a positive impression, and one of competence. (Of course, if the client clearly needs some help, don't be shy about offering it!)

Corporate IT (consulting) is a little different to the appliance repair-shop. You really have to engage the customer; the appliance store simply needs to sell you something.

Carolyn Ann

Kevin:
Invoices, business cards, how you answer the phone. It all speaks to your brand and the value people perceive from it. Are you a good brand steward? What is your promise? These are all pieces of the brand impression.

Valeria - I'm slowly making the rounds this week, but I enjoyed your post.

"A brand is built both on the company's characteristics and the perceptions of what the company does in the marketplace -- scarcity and demand are just one of the considerations."

Perception is all too often reality and companies really need to listen to their customers to learn their motivations and their perceptions.

We're doing this excercise in a vacuum, but it occurs to me that the comments from clients that their rates are high might not be a bad thing for two reasons...it keeps out clients that do not fit their target and/or they are delivering a level of value that clients don't mind paying the higher rate.

People pay a premium for luxury autos for example and, while this is not apples to apples, they don't mind paying more for the quality and safety that comes along with the price tag.

But if that is the case here, the detailed invoices must change as you discuss above.

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