« Connection Kata: Can You Keep a Secret? | Main | M20 Interview by Peter Kim »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c03bb53ef00e55071969e8834

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Blog Action Day: How Social Media is Greening the Planet:

Comments

Karen:

You get kudos and a special prize for coming back to this conversation. Thank you so much! Machiavelli wasn't that bad after all. In fact, he might have been a genius -- among the many from Italy ;-) -- to see that when we're talking about power, the end tends to justify the means, at least in the eyes and opinions of many.

Not all though, and that's where we will see some companies advance from the pack. I don't know about you, I'm getting pretty eager for some action of the positive kind.

The term social is good, after all. It brings us back to the idea and hopefully forum of the guilds, communities, tribes, whatever we choose to call the love for delivering great work, together.

Valeria

I took a look at the video you suggested on the topic of "is 'conversation' being overused and cliche?" Interesting comments.

From my own experience (as well as gaging the responses on the video), it seems that business might be afraid of the word conversation for a couple of reasons (thanks, I see your point). Business is, by its very nature, extremely competitive. If having a conversation means encouraging active dialogue with varied points of view, then perhaps business feels it might lose control of a situation, and therefore a degree of their competitiveness. In this case, having a conversation might be considered a threat.

It all comes down to winning in the business world - how to market and sell stuff in a way that improves the bottom-line. It's not always about how you play the game, it's whether or not you win in business (we can see the results of this ruleplaying as scandals continue to rip companies apart who continue to buy into this outdated line of thinking).

The irony is that, as Yves Behar suggests, "doing what your competitors are doing is not the answer. The connection to your customer has to be unique, not formulaic."

It seems that companies who encourage conversation through connections, dialogue and good old-fashioned decency will be the real winners in this new world of business.

The golden rule hasn't changed - just the technology. Listen to your customers.

@Xavier -- What a brilliant post! Thank you for sharing and welcome to the conversation. People are making the connection between what they do in their lives and how they could improve on sustainability through the spreading of this conversation on social media. Better to have that conversation wherever we can than not have it in the mainstream.

@Karen -- when we talked about conversation being cliche' or overused (see video a couple of posts ago) we also noted that organizations do not really follow on the term and its meaning. Social, as you point out, is rooted to society as in the people. Customers are people and companies are trying to get into social networks (vs. social media) to sell. No doubt, this is a conversation we're having through social (public) media ;-)

@Mario -- depends on what part of the world you're in. Many did start early.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Advisory Boards


As seen on

Social

Marketing that makes business sense


Conversations


Book Reviews


Comment Policy and Social Guidelines

  • This is my blog and not a public space. Critical discourse is welcomed. However, inappropriate comments will be deleted. See my social guidelines for reference.

Disclaimer

  • The opinions blogged herein represent only those of Valeria Maltoni and do not reflect those of her employer, persons or companies mentioned herein, or anyone else.

© Valeria Maltoni


  • This work is protected by copyright. It may be quoted and excerpted. Beyond a sentence or two, you should ask for permission before publication.

  • Conversation AgentTM

  • © 2006-2014 Valeria Maltoni.