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@Carolyn Ann -- I'm hard pressed to think that the company could not come up with a strategy to respond to a story that is almost one year old. I will have to dig up examples of companies that started with a product marketed one way to them discover that customers found other uses... and to honor those (not to mention how lucrative that may be).

@CK -- we must be missing some crucial piece of information. What connects the dots? I agree with Carolyn Ann, the woman should be given a medal for persisting through it.

@Gianandrea -- it seemed like an opportunity to tell a human story. Mrs. Shriver looks like a great testimonial for a "real" campaign.

Maybe military did not stockpile the stuff because there were no lucrative contract behind.
I'm 100th% against this war which seems to me not resolving the problem with terrorism. But I understand the desire to protect those who serve the nation and, most of all, I understand that woman who only want to see his son again at home.
From a marketing point of view, I agree with Valeria. There must be a way to get some juice from the story.

Very good points in your post and the comments. Am I missing something...or in the article where it says that "it's been long known to be effective in combat" (I'm paraphrasing)--then why wouldn't the military stockpile this stuff? I must be missing something.

Bless that woman for getting it to her son (and others).

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