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I think the reason why consumers have not heard about this credit card is because they really do not spell out how it works. What does this mean to me aside from giving me anonymity?

I know people whose companies switched from Corporate American Express to Diners' Club, a quasi non entity. As in your example, that made it extremely hard to charge travel expenses on the card. Then again, some companies have done away with corporate cards entirely, asking you to use yours ;-)

Even experienced teams like this one forget that people are not going to flock to something they may at some point remarked about unless you spell out the benefits.

The Revolution Card isn't even Evolutionary! It answers a problem that doesn't actually exist. Or if it does, it's perceived to exist: and that's the important bit.

There's a complexity to the idea that would take longer than the typical elevator pitch to state; and that's the death-knell for a consumer product.

Consumers already have credit cards, and at least a limited level of trust that online purchases have some protection. They also have the knowledge that some benefits accrue from using existing credit cards - they're a known quantity. (For instance - I use one particular card for just about every purchase I make. As I pay the bill every month, I get the convenience of cash without having to actually remember to go to the bank! And I can use it online, and off-line.)

Within the context of financial security, I think PayPal has the appropriate level of obscurity - you're not completely anonymous, but neither are you completely known. More than that - and you'll have to convince me it's actually in my best interest to have a credit card that's less anonymous than cash! You'll also have to convince me about warranty complaints, and who I can sue if I need to. Credit card companies assume a certain liability; does this card?

Besides, any efforts to persuade me to change how I transact business has to persuade me that it's in my best interest: and it can't do that without some tangible benefits. (I was once forced to use an obscure credit card, one of the high-end ones, for a job I had. The bank I worked for owned that company, and that was that. It was, quite simply, a nuisance beyond description. It was way too obscure for most of my needs; even a million vendors is obscure, and I resorted to actually filling out a dozen forms - each and every month - in order to use my regular credit card.)

Anyway, at this point in time, "credit" is a bit of a four-letter word!

Carolyn Ann

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