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Valeria,
I agree that the value of comments in the whole equation is immense. It's interesting, isn't it, how the communication model of "we" media works. By closing the feedback loop, information can become both stronger and more relevant to the community participating in the conversation and also to those who interact with information at an observer's level. If, indeed, a participatory model is beneficial to the quality of the content itself, then everyone wins, right?

I need to get my hands on the book that hierarchy chart came from for my thesis research! I can't believe I haven't run across it yet with a 2000 pub date.

When MSM and others do not read nor respond to comments they miss out. The opportunity is there for the taking to learn and have your thinking evolved as a result. I am learning a great deal from you and all the generous people who share their experiences and take.

It might go back to needing to manage risk -- if you say nothing in response, they might go away. To me the comments is where the action happens.

You are absolutely right on not owning the story. I will be talking about my experience on that in the next week.

Thank you for an enriching and thought provoking angle.

Excellent article/diagrams, thought prompts and guests; inspiring minds indeed.

As far as rev gen models go, this month’s Wired magazine’s 'life cycle of a blog post' diagram http://www.wired.com/special_multimedia/2008/ff_secretlife_1602 talks a bit about the print/new media journalism paradigm shift that hasn’t fully evolved yet, and even uses the example of ‘those deforesting paper rectangles’ (aka the subscription card blow-in’ biz model) as a cheap but effective medium to snag subscribers/boost ad numbers, etc.) Firmly agree that the ‘we’ aspect of community building and participatory journalism can heighten conversation into a richness and multi-faceted experience that goes far beyond techno gizmos and Twitterdom into Doug Engelbart’s ‘knowledge repository’ concept of collective intelligence.

Just look at the MySpace/MTV debates flinging questions and receiving hands-on feedback from the online youth audience. That beats a press conference or one-way conversation any day because all parties can refine/correct and converse on the spot to be understood in a ‘community’ setting rather than have a skewed POV or reframed context w/an editorial agenda. (though some of the MSM journalist/blog pundits have gone on record saying they ‘never even read the comments on their stories much less respond’ which is utterly confusing to me in terms of adaptation to the new media opportunity for growth and understanding)

As a former journalist and current blogger myself, new media’s potential for two-way dialog and open ended conversation (which BG puts in brilliant context on a global scale) is a huge asset in data pooling pragmatics and reporting as well. (sites like Ushahidi filter vital data locally/abroad, particularly in crisis) We’ve been using our blog to stream this kind of info to our Kenya colleagues from gwln.org and e-blast assistance/info e.g.: http://www.shapingyouth.org/blog/?p=1021 while NPTech bloggers enroll others who want to help in the conversation by using digital media to take action pronto: i.e. http://tinyurl.com/33bsbj

Finally, I’m living proof that NONE of us ‘own the story’ anymore, using my recent accidental NYT/Target brouhaha as an example, one of my nonprofit board advisors encouraged, “look, you’ve seeded the story, planted the idea, and enabled new conversation to take root, and hopefully, it will eventually bloom into the original context you intended rather than the thorny, tangled vine where it’s living now.” That is where digital media has legs far beyond linear, one-dimensional prose.

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