« How to Attend a Conference | Main | Be a Renaissance Woman: we Are Back to the Middle Ages »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c03bb53ef00e5523019528834

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Words Matter - Upon Trajan's Column:

Comments

We're missing the melted bronze.
The spacing between words, letters, and line breaks is another (as Roger pointed out)

Then there's also the lack of lowercase letters, which by contrast identify the beginning of sentences and serve to accentuate individual words like Names.

With increasing digitalism, the contrast and attention to beautiful typography will increase, not to mention the handwritten/artistic.

The Grotesk typefaces (sans-serifs) serve to increase readability in particular contexts like small text and road signage.

Valeria - Here's my post on Trajan. It's elegant indeed. I like it best used with small caps, so the first letter has greater prominence.
http://vellandi.wordpress.com/2008/03/30/trajan-the-original-roman-serif/

@Mahesh - your blog offered many refreshing ideas and images. Thank you for reaching out with this comment. I've enjoyed getting to know how you think.

@Joanna - to me it's balance. Sometimes it's fine to be hanging out and chatting. The deeper need to develop a thought is in long hand, or long form. Many recently have brought into question the value of self publishing. Perhaps there is less time... the value depends on what we put into it.

@Roger - I am reading your book now and enjoying it tremendously. What a great whack on the side of the head! The other notable element that was missing then, was the character for "U". Good thing my name is Valeria, a very Roman name.

@Trainerdave - thank you for joining in. As I am not an expert in fonts, just a Roman history buff via linguistics and classic studies, I will defer to Roger for your request.

Roger, great link to what's "missing"! History reveals as much in its form as in its substance.

Serifs themselves must have a reason for being, beyond aesthetics. Why go thru the trouble of adding tails to the ends of letter strokes?

And why do the Swiss remove the serifs? I'd enjoy seeing a post pointing to those reasons. Like most changes of form, I'm sure these are not arbitrary but lend function / practicality .

The comments to this entry are closed.

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Advisory Boards


As seen on

Social

Marketing that makes business sense


Conversations


Book Reviews


Comment Policy and Social Guidelines

  • This is my blog and not a public space. Critical discourse is welcomed. However, inappropriate comments will be deleted. See my social guidelines for reference.

Disclaimer

  • The opinions blogged herein represent only those of Valeria Maltoni and do not reflect those of her employer, persons or companies mentioned herein, or anyone else.