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Brilliance is a gift but what makes it special is relating to an audience and those we love. Randy wasn't always the person he became – he evolved over time. I've known a few brilliant ones who were emotionally stunted. As a Trainer of issues on Diversity for the last 2 decades, my goal has been for people to recognize what we all have in common and to remain open to different views and learning styles. I remember telling my parents – at the tender age of 20 after taking a philosophy class in college, that one day the world would all be mixed – as in race – that everyone is human and it didn't matter who I might fall in love with (I was raised Jewish so naturally my parents wanted me to carry on with someone of the same faith). Randy was introspective and inspirational - while I have not watched his video yet, I saw him on ABC with Diane Sawyer tonight. It appears his soul was at peace and his family/friends will carry forth the message he shared with us all – follow your dreams. We are all fortunate to have witnessed his courage, honesty and vulnerability. As you said previously – it is all about "how we show up as human beings."

Hi all,

"I think for most, they spend their whole lives not realizing the impact that they can have on others. And for others, they never realize or know the effect that their actions had on others until it's too late if at all."

Thanks Marc.

To me, we become what we are by that which we are least aware.

For all our ability as sentient beings, we are largely blind to the cause and effect of what we are and what we seek to become - we cannot see our being in the world.

It's everything we are in every moment - It's our intent as human - our warmth/love/compassion, how we say things, our relationship with time, our impulsiveness, our generosity, the way we physically interact with others, our frustration with our own humanity, our relationship with death and all that we don't know about being human (and which generations to come will no doubt reveal).

All this being/intent changes the world in orders of causation that are beyond comprehension - whether we know or not we change the world each moment - though it takes faith in character to trust the unknowable outcome.

Unfortunately (wrong word) because it's really difficult to see our own being we tend to focus on what the mind intends which it can measure (and satisfy itself that it's not wasting time).

We tend to undervalue our being because it doesn't seem to do anything productive - but of course its there - beavering away at what one day will be the direction of your life (and maybe the direction of many lives).

In my view, death and reflections on it break us from our servitude to the mind (what we intend), time* and measurement. It breaks the illusion and reveals the "eternal concrete" that is our being.

Just gathering thoughts publicly

* Marc - I'm fascinated by the concept of micro-interactions ? And will think about this


@Valeria. Amazing how prescient your comments are. We wrestle with perceived outcomes because of our inability to step back and see something for what it really is, or what it really might be. Timing, opportunity and courage Valeria could be bottled into a book on how to succeed in business and or in life. Unfortunately, we all seem to go by what our friends and colleagues do and say. It is, to some degree, our roadmap for life. Our interactions with our peers determine a lot. What we need to realize is that there is sooo much more to being who we are if we lower our guard. I know it sounds easier. But I'm trying. To the extent I find it now dominating my thoughts since last Friday.

@David Thank you for your kind words. I really really believe that for what it's worth that I'm going through one of those seminal, epiphany like moments in my life, where somehow some way, I now get it. Yes it's about me, but more importantly it's about me in relation to my impact on others. But it doesn't work if I don't consciously realize that I can make a difference by doing very small impactful things. A few words, an action, a smile, the written word, a note, etc etc,,. All very non labor conducive, but very weighty in their effect and reach. I think for most, they spend their whole lives not realizing the impact that they can have on others. And for others, they never realize or know the effect that their actions had on others until it's too late if at all.

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