« Are You Conversationally Tone-Deaf? | Main | The Importance of the Invisible »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c03bb53ef00e5548e8aa48833

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Showing Customer Reviews on Your Site:

» Word of Mouth Geniuses of the Week from GasPedal's You Can Be a Word of Mouth Marketing Supergenius!
Gord Hotchkiss, MediaPostBranding by Word of MouthWord of mouth relies so heavily on positive recommendations from people you know; here, Gord examines the trust factor and explains why the opinion of someone else means so much to us. (link) Gianluca [Read More]

Comments

@Christopher - customers weigh reviews according to their beliefs and familiarity with products. I noticed that with Amazon, for example. More than once I and others bought books that had poor reviews because maybe we knew the author, or someone we knew (and trusted) told us it was good, etc.

@Ari - I will let Gianluca respond to the question about rating sites. I do not read enough Italian blogs or visit enough sites to have an informed opinion about it. Thank you for the link to Jacob's post. His thinking is very much in line with mine.

@Clay - one step at a time to allow the representatives of the business to experience social media is a good strategy. I find that just talking about these issues does not help much unless one is willing to try. It's true for social media, of course, as it is with everything else in life.

@Gianpaolo - perhaps Gianluca would be willing to follow up with you about your experiment with bloggers and other audiences. I'd definitely be interested in learning what you discovered. Did people write spontaneously? What percentage? Let me know if you'd like to talk about it.

@Dave - I had to think about your comment a little bit because I have experienced a derogatory comment on this site only once. In that case I modified the comment telling the audience I was doing that and why. There was no need to be offensive. If I expect to have that freedom on my site, I should allow the same freedom to companies. There is a lot more animosity towards entities as there is (usually) towards people. It's easier to justify to oneself. I agree that the responsibility for communication rests on both sides. You might enjoy Connie's guest post on being tone-deaf, too.

@Dominic - I wonder if there are already tools or sites in place where Dell does just that. I know the team and have interacted with them on several occasions and I can tell you that *they* truly get it. However, you must understand that they are still representing the company. This may mean that Dell itself has policies in place. The difficulty with social media for a corporation is that you wear two hats at all times and adhere to your personal values as well as the interest of the business. I will be talking about this at the MIMA Summit on October 1st in Minneapolis. Stay tuned for the presentation at their site (linked on the sidebar).

The comments to this entry are closed.

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Advisory Boards


As seen on

Social

Marketing that makes business sense


Conversations


Book Reviews


Comment Policy and Social Guidelines

  • This is my blog and not a public space. Critical discourse is welcomed. However, inappropriate comments will be deleted. See my social guidelines for reference.

Disclaimer

  • The opinions blogged herein represent only those of Valeria Maltoni and do not reflect those of her employer, persons or companies mentioned herein, or anyone else.

© Valeria Maltoni


  • This work is protected by copyright. It may be quoted and excerpted. Beyond a sentence or two, you should ask for permission before publication.

  • Conversation AgentTM

  • © 2006-2014 Valeria Maltoni.