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Hi Valeria,

My intention was not to be provocative but compassionate towards those who suffer in silence when Brands die.

That brands live on after the death of the Company (thank you Garland, Oliver and Mike) may be the best way to understand how brands work when the Company is alive.

But what happens to the individual who invests themselves in a brand - and in whose image they have come to mirror their own personal identity. Surely that hurts.

"Or maybe our brands on a personal level evolve so rapidly with social media that we have shifted our preference over already by the time we realize the brand is dead."

That strikes me as devolution.

Peter

@Garland - Peter is an interesting individual and I think his question is provocative. I'll be curious to see if anyone thinks social media can help.

@Olivier - extending the analogy. When a brand is well liked, it endures the failure of its underlying business to care for it. Zombies, huh? Just in time for Halloween.

@Mike - I have seen an example of brands that have died and everyone but the decision makers knowing it. What we did not get to discuss is the possibility that social media could help with the grievance process. Or maybe our brands on a personal level evolve so rapidly with social media that we have shifted our preference over already by the time we realize the brand is dead.

Some brands are dead and don't know it. Or perhaps I should say the employees and customers know it but the senior leaders have yet to get the memo.

At other times a business and therefore its brand will fail.

Regardless, the advice to embrace the grieving is exactly right.

And Olivier's notion of "zombie brands" sends my mind racing in more than a few directions.

An example like Indian Motorcycle comes to mind.

Keep creating...a brand worth raving about,
Mike

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