« Can Public Relations Save the News (New) Media? | Main | Divide or Conquer »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c03bb53ef0105357a93dc970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Would You Tell Your Customers (and Your Employees) How Bad it is?:

Comments

Your comment about the Warren Buffett video reminds me of all the times a visionary has been called crazy. Leading means also being ahead of the times, having foresight and insight from that.

About communicating "fallibility when it's appropriate" you inspired me to think about not using failure as a crux, or an excuse. Not just companies, everyone. What is the plan? Where do we go from here? And also, acknowledging it without making excuses.

I read Carol Dweck's book a long time ago - what a thought-provoking read! It's easy to win when all you know is winning, or is it?

Lots of good thoughts here, Valeria, in both the post & the comments. A few points I'd like to address:

--The Warren Buffett video is excellent. He's an excellent example of the transparency you're talking about. I well remember the criticisms about Berkshire's cash hoard from a couple of years back, but he was totally forthright with his shareholders about why he was holding that money. Now Berkshire is down only ~10% for the past 12 months, compared to 35+% for the Dow Jones or S&P.

--"One of the reasons why companies are having such a hard time with social media is an innate inability to look less than perfect to the public." Amen! Companies have spent so long adopting a pose of infallibility that they don't know how to communicate their fallibility when that's appropriate.

--"Timing is not ideal ... There is never greater opportunity as that earned in uncertain times." Just so. In Carol Dweck's book Mindset, she quotes Billie Jean King about the ability of the greatest sports champions to win even when things aren't perfect. Now is the time for the rest of us to cultivate that quality in ourselves.

@Marcel - beyond building trust and confidence, you are also giving employees and customers the tools to make better decisions. Where to focus their time, what they can do to help, etc. Those are the building blocks of relationships and loyalty. We all know that people join solid plans and vision. You make some excellent points.

@Ricardo - one of the fears is to be judged, another one is to lose the trust others have placed in us. But, I think also that people buy from you because of who you are and integrity is important to represent that.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Advisory Boards


As seen on

Social

Marketing that makes business sense


Conversations


Book Reviews


Comment Policy and Social Guidelines

  • This is my blog and not a public space. Critical discourse is welcomed. However, inappropriate comments will be deleted. See my social guidelines for reference.

Disclaimer

  • The opinions blogged herein represent only those of Valeria Maltoni and do not reflect those of her employer, persons or companies mentioned herein, or anyone else.

© Valeria Maltoni


  • This work is protected by copyright. It may be quoted and excerpted. Beyond a sentence or two, you should ask for permission before publication.

  • Conversation AgentTM

  • © 2006-2014 Valeria Maltoni.