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@Rick - thank you for the link to your video, very instructive! Being able to articulate things simply is a gift. Communicating with customers on an ongoing basis is important, as is staying real and authentic. And as you say, that does not cost a lot financially. I especially liked the comment on passion.

@Sonny - things do have a way of coming out anyway, don't they? With the information of how things stand there should be a plan on how the business is working or going to work through it. Also, in times like this, people need to know they are part of the solution.

Re: "Honest, candid conversations can cast a business into a good light."

It can and it really does. Honesty is the best practice! But I think that it's also easier said than done and perhaps that's why people struggle with it.

Jon raised an excellent example in his comment above and it's something that I've experienced as well which is why I say that "honesty" works best. It's not until you try it that you experience that little known fact.

I'm a strong believer in transparent communication during the good times and challenging times. Without it you can't build trust & confidence. Employees are smart and generally know what's going on anyway, so you have an opportunity to build trust & confidence by articulating what they are feeling/seeing anyway and interpreting the situation. If you can describe your company's vision and priorities in the face of an accurate and transparent view of the current environment, then employees will see that you have a realistic view and yet your plan makes sense.

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