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Heh. Orangina! I don't consider that a soda, though; more like fizzy juice. The first time I drank, let alone heard of, Orangina was at Au Bon Pain about 10-15 years ago.

@Len - the other consideration is that a car is quite a tangible product, as is a drink. How about focusing on the product and yes, using the symbol to alert customers that something has changed, but go ahead and tell us what has changed (and why we care).

@Darryl - glad you found this conversation useful and congratulations on making contact with Bonin.

@Ari - I'll remember that: "a social conversation on carbonation!" I know people who are quite passionate about drinking only Pepsi or only Coke. for me growing up it was Fanta, the orange carbonated drink. I think today you can also find Orangina in some stores, Trader Joe's has had them in stock.

Several years ago, while driving through Atlanta, I stopped at the global headquarters of Coca-Cola and entered their museum.

Laid out as an experience with a start, middle, and end, there was a point about halfway through the "tour" when I entered the tasting room and its elaborate schema of cylinders and tubes -- where I held Dixie cups and tasted the World of Coca-Cola that I never knew existed because they weren't distributed in Amerca: recipes from China, Japan, England, and South Africa. Fuzzy drinks that tasted more like watermelon juice than, err, Coke.

Coca-Cola, like Pepsi, is not a logo. They're not even brands. They are conversations, if such a concept could have a physical image that can connect people.

Who in the world doesn't know what a sip of Coke or Pepsi tastes like? A social conversation of carbonation!

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