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I think maybe part of the issue is that embargoes seem corporate and counterproductive. PR people's jobs are to get people excited about covering their product, and doing a pitch followed by "oh but you can't talk about this or that and you cant post your review before such-and-such date" leaves people with a bad taste.

Also, @ari, companies preferquantity over quality because it makes for good report talk.

On the quantity camp is the number of mentions, regardless of the outlet. Let's say I work on a story about a specific technology or trend - this is the shotgun approach. Get as many mentions as possible.

On the quality camp it's focused mentions on the one or two specific publications that cover that technology or service. This may be more relevant to readers and thus create opportunities to continue the conversation. However, what is more visible is the number of mentions, still today. Even as those mentioned may not lead to a potential customer referral.

Quantity is easier to like. Think about social media, for example. There are many who are obsessed with measuring number of comments or number of links, or RSS subscriptions... It's easy to get distracted by higher counts.

Many times the posts that do not generate comments here, lead to meaningful conversations off line. There are ways to balance both by building relationships over time, coming through, being a reliable source and not selling the barn for a moment of "glory".

Good question. What's your take?

Valeria, in your response to Brian, you indicate orgs prefer quantity over quality.

Why is this, and can you provide an example from each camp you've encountered?

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