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@Rob - you make a very good point on using creativity to your advantage. Differentiation does come in early in the game. When I receive calls, I will not spend time on the phone if the person on the other hand just has a script. To me it's the person calling in charge of the initial questions.

@Joy-Mari - that's very interesting. Actors memorize the script and then build the character upon it for the camera, the scene, and eventually the audience. After having memorized or learned what you need to know, it's easier to then be more present to the conversation.

@Phil - I like the way you put it "investment in the moment" and paying attention. I've written about conversation as a dance with a rhythm. Sometimes when you look at things differently, what you thought was a problem, may not be anymore.

If you watch any good improvisational comedy, you see that the true key to success is complete investment in the moment--watching and listening for cues from your partner(s). Anything can be the seed for the arc and resolution of the scene if all participants are paying close attention to each other. It's really just a heightened example of any good conversation, not playing for comedy but for honesty and integrity. Improvisation might not always lead to the right solution, but it certainly opens up the door to fresh approaches to the problem. Another fascinating post.

I was lucky that I worked at two companies who both wanted us to do problem solving. They gave us scripts and we were told to memorise them and *adapt* these scripts to our needs.

Every customer is different. So that's how you should treat them.

Rob, I disagree that you should use the same sales script for every customer. You should make it personal and relevant to each customer.

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