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From your observation I also notice something else. That often people measure and analyze things loudly. It's what I call the "photo opp" - whoever is seen in the act of doing something is considered more important and relevant, regardless of whom is actually doing something important and relevant. This happens daily in organizations (but also online: have you seen discussion about influentials?) and it's called politics.

For example - in my post on Pixar, I noted that there was a discussion with a writer who contributed content to Toy Story 2 but did not get the credit.

Noticing has effect on actions and results, too. In many instances I have experienced, the person who gets noticed was copying (she does not have experience in the field, just the title) and does not know what was behind what she copied. Organizations provide incentive for the wrong behaviors all the time by encouraging environments where the loudest (most political) gets the hearing and credit.

Valeria, you make a great point as usual. Loud is definitely more common nowadays, but I often think it has a lot to do with the way we analyze and measure. If you're loud, and a buyer is ready to buy, you might get the deal. If they are not, you have lost them. If you whisper, you will move them gently closer to the deal in both situations. But, when we measure only the immediate-term effects, it looks like the "loud" strategy was better, even though it was actually the worse strategy in the long term.

Measurement has effects on actions, for better or for worse, so we need to be careful exactly how we measure our marketing efforts in this economy so as to avoid incenting the wrong behaviours.

Thanks for the post, much enjoyed.

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