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Valeria, 100 volumes on branding could not be as poignant as your comment that branding is really just "... creating an expectation and then meeting that with an experience." I particularly like your insight that it's not the substance that is the problem so much as over-hyping the substance.

It's a reminder that as marketers and business communicators we establish the bar that our customers use to measure our performance.

That's why honesty and transparency are the most valuable weapons in maintaining the customer relationship.

Great post!

I'm glad you provided that example - and I see it was fresh on your mind form your blog. I just preferred the Cingular brand to AT&T.

I struggle with the concept of constantly working on weaknesses instead of using our strengths to their best. Sometimes we need to work with the hand we've been dealt. In the example of the house being built near a train track - well, short of not buying that house... there's no changing that.

I am more inclined to buy from a company when they don't try to hide problems. The old Cingular campaign about having the fewest dropped calls was effective in that it did not pretend that dropped calls were non-existent on cell phones. The company acknowledged the issue and created the impression that they work harder to fix it than the other guys.

When looking for people to collaborate with creatively, I am more likely to go with people who let me see not only their strengths but also their weaknesses. It's easier for me to trust someone who can acknowledge areas for improvement in himself or herself.

In both cases, it's ideal if the people involved aren't content to promote what they can't change, but are actively promoting and acknowledging things in an effort to drive change.

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  • The opinions blogged herein represent only those of Valeria Maltoni and do not reflect those of her employer, persons or companies mentioned herein, or anyone else.