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@Barbara - indeed, it's much easier to see faults and issues than it is to be constructive. In the end, we get the media we pay for and deserve. It's a bit extreme, but I know that the only way to make it a better for yourself is by acting on making it better.

@Mary - there was a considerable capital investment in the infrastructure created to support "print". And I constantly see reports that news print is profitable, still... ironically, we hear about when things go wrong.

@Rachel - I do wonder about the need for immediacy at (sometimes) the expense of context and depth. I agree that some news needs speed. But does it all?

@Tiffany - where I grew up, we had high civic engagement. Maybe it's because I didn't grow up here and do not know the ways in which people are engaged in their township, community, etc. for example, but I do not see it at the same level. Time and attention scarcity lead us down a proxy path - we place trust in sources, filters as you call them. I find tremendous value in trained/experienced journalists and reporters and hope we do find ways to have a model that supports their involvement.

Very interesting analysis. I think it's fascinating (and somewhat terrifying) the concept that the quality of the news in an ecosystem like this depends more heavily on user engagement, critique, analysis.

Then again, maybe we haven't been demanding this from journalism for a while now, so will it really hurt democracy for the percieved "objectivity" of the news to be served up for what it perhaps really is already?

Interesting questions.

I think, as you mention, that filters will become key, and we will place more and more trust on organizations and entities that can help us filter content and ask the important questions about what we choose to consume in our "media diet" as one of my professors is known to call it.

What is the future of news, you ask? Simple - whatever gets us answers quickly. I think ten years down the line, the news media that survive will be those we run to to confirm a story right away. I think it will be largely internet-based - Twitter, Facebook, real-time services that give us answers right away. I think there will be new social media sites along these lines that we can't even imagine yet. But they will be fast.

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