« Forrester says Sponsored Conversations are OK | Main | The "Fall in Love" and "Now I Know You" Effects »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c03bb53ef0112791778b428a4

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Twitter Brings Interaction to Events:

Comments

This is an interesting conversation and I'm curious to see the continued discussion. Just looking at the header image of the post disturbs me. As a speaker, who wants to look out over a sea of heads looking down at their phone? It seems to me that if you're typing, you're not truly paying attention to the conversation. A sporadic tweet here and there, or recapping the event after, I understand. But I don't know that I'd be thrilled to see a constant stream of updates from everyone in the room!

That being said, as a follower unable to attend the event, it might be worthwhile to "view" the presentation real time. Perhaps there is another way around it - having a designated "Twitterer" for the presentation (and announced beforehand so users can follow that person)?

@Chris - we have tried prepared questions a few times, but it always ends up sounding like we've planted the questions! One thing I have done recently was hand out postcards at the breaks, asking people to jot down a question for the Q&A session at the end. That worked a bit better. I suppose I see a gadget-facilitated Q&A as a more sophisticated version of this.

Maybe we could have an open Twitter-based Q&A after the event, with public questions and answers happening in the feed - give people a bit of time to think about any questions, and take the formal "put your hand up" sting out of things. Got a big(ish) event coming up at the end of the month, might try it at that...

@Mike - would tweeting in class be distracting to you? When I present I like to make lots of eye contact and read body language from the people in the room. In some venues I do better than in others. There is a rhythm to the conversation, even when it's mostly from one source towards an audience. But, I'm aware that learning styles can be visual, auditory, kinetic.

@Chris - indeed, with a smaller group it is easier to establish rapport and connect with each attendee. And it is very much situational, both depending on the speaker and the audience.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Advisory Boards


As seen on

Social

Marketing that makes business sense


Conversations


Book Reviews


Comment Policy and Social Guidelines

  • This is my blog and not a public space. Critical discourse is welcomed. However, inappropriate comments will be deleted. See my social guidelines for reference.

Disclaimer

  • The opinions blogged herein represent only those of Valeria Maltoni and do not reflect those of her employer, persons or companies mentioned herein, or anyone else.

© Valeria Maltoni


  • This work is protected by copyright. It may be quoted and excerpted. Beyond a sentence or two, you should ask for permission before publication.

  • Conversation AgentTM

  • © 2006-2014 Valeria Maltoni.