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I agree that social media tools like Twitter bring interaction to conversations and events, but I can't help thinking it's a cowardly type of interaction. You say "Not everyone is ready to ask a question in front of a group, and Twitter has become an alternative to doing that." Isn't allowing somebody to hide behind technology really doing them a disservice? People should have no reason not to state out loud what they are thinking. I'm afraid tools like Twitter will get people into the mindset of thinking they can hide behind a computer or smartphone when something is going wrong.

I work for a fairly "old school" company where not only have half the people in meetings probably never heard of Twitter, but they make everyone switch off Blackberries, phones etc while in meetings.

This probably makes for more effective "top down" communication of information, but makes any Q&A sessions very formal and maybe a little adversarial for genuine interaction and debate.

I'm interested in whether we could let people use Tweets or texts for the Q&A sessions, whilst still keeping better focus in the "info delivery" by banning the gadgets. Does anyone do anything similar to this?

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