« Why Blog + 25 Tips to Make it Work - Free eBook | Main | Twitter - Macro Insights from Micro Interactions »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c03bb53ef01156eb0e6bb970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Who's the Fool?:

Comments

Thinking further (and this is as good a place as any to think) - I suspect there is something which I'll call a brand artifact which triggers a brand response in the consumer.

What may be happening in late capitalism is that technology has enabled brand artifacts to essentially multiply to the point that it is becoming harder for consumers to see/hear etc brand for the fog/noise of old and new brand artifacts . Moreover, attempts to develop new artifacts to signify brand ie. twitter, by their ubiquity quickly lose their ability to signify anything to the consumer.

I suspect that the rise of social media is somehow linked to an environment essentially polluted by an excess of these artifacts. Unable to simply rely on the artifact the consumer must engage with companies to find the meaning once silently and without awareness imported into the relationship.

Again interesting ( to me anyway).

Co-incidentally I picked up a copy of Barthe's Mythologies today and now find myself reading you on myths through his definition of myth as a type of speech.

That aside (or inside), I'd like to return to who is killing brands/capitalism and in particular the "myth" "that we can manage what the brand means to our customer".

I think Customers may rely on things external to the brand to give meaning to the brand ( and independently of the brand).

Take the concert violist in the subway - he has an inherent brand which is all but unheard/felt etc without external clues or signifiers of greatness( except to the kiddies) - clothes, the concert hall, the revues, the high price ticket etc.

What if a similar thing happens with companies- what if brands need a parallel catalyst ( the cue or signifier) in order to be seen/heard/felt by the consumer?

Ideas that follow from this:

* is there a lingua franca of capitalism which enables consumers to give meaning to brands

* is that language becoming a dead language

* what does a company do if, consumers can no longer recognise the external cues, signifiers etc that give meaning to its brands? As with the concert violinist, they (consumer) may not work out the violinist's brand without some clues in the background.


Interesting

Peter

The comments to this entry are closed.

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Advisory Boards


As seen on

Social

Marketing that makes business sense


Conversations


Book Reviews


Comment Policy and Social Guidelines

  • This is my blog and not a public space. Critical discourse is welcomed. However, inappropriate comments will be deleted. See my social guidelines for reference.

Disclaimer

  • The opinions blogged herein represent only those of Valeria Maltoni and do not reflect those of her employer, persons or companies mentioned herein, or anyone else.

© Valeria Maltoni


  • This work is protected by copyright. It may be quoted and excerpted. Beyond a sentence or two, you should ask for permission before publication.

  • Conversation AgentTM

  • © 2006-2014 Valeria Maltoni.