« Email is the New Offline | Main | Register.com’s Customer Service Listens »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c03bb53ef01156fe044b3970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Catch the News on NPR:

Comments

I catch the NPR news daily and even take in the opening part of BBC news when NPR makes the switch at night. They try to bring in news that's not one-sided. I find it refreshing and often much more hopeful about many topics they explore.

Brian,

That "imagine if they could convince just half their audience to engage one another" made me think about the idea of convincing anyone to do anything. Should we move more to verbs like inspiring, attracting, engaging?

I do like their tone and the programming selection - more BBC than entertainment. Let's hope they keep it up.

I found that listening to the local radio stations during my two hours commuting each day actually made me more tense and irritated. They play the same, top 40 crap songs that the RIAA tells them to play over and over. They prattle on and on about how they are the first to give you this, or how they give away more money than anyone else. And they break it all up with the most annoying commercials ever made.

On a whim, I switched over to NPR one morning. I've been hooked ever since. It was great to hear calm voices talk about the news. All Things Considered, Talk of the Nation, Marketplace, and the 20 minute-delayed BBC news are staples of my weekdays. The coverage is quality and, while there is a tendency to hear the same story and sound clips brought up almost hourly in different programs when something big happens (AIG bonuses, for example), I really enjoy listening to NPR.

A little long-winded here, today, but as a fan of NPR, I've noticed their social media efforts. They will regularly insert mention of recent stories that were particularly hot and remind listeners that the content is available online, to re-play or share, as well as to participate in online discussion.

I've, personally, been moved to register on the NPR website so that I might participate in the discussion there. The story - one in which the head of the Republican National Committee at the time flat out failed to speak intelligently, repeating a boilerplate canned comment half a dozen times in one of the most awkward, uncomfortable interviews I've ever heard - was so moving that I spent half an hour in the car, knowing I would get online as soon as I walked in the door to find the story online and comment. That's what NPR is trying to do and I suspect they're going to pull it off.

NPR provides the latest news, but rather than waste so much time claiming to be the best, they simply demonstrate their commitment to delivering a sound mix of news, culture, and intelligent information. I think more people out there are finding they've had enough sensationalism and are seeking exactly what NPR has to offer. Their position is promising. Imagine if they could convince just half their audience to engage one another on their website...

The comments to this entry are closed.

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Advisory Boards


As seen on

Social

Marketing that makes business sense


Conversations


Book Reviews


Comment Policy and Social Guidelines

  • This is my blog and not a public space. Critical discourse is welcomed. However, inappropriate comments will be deleted. See my social guidelines for reference.

Disclaimer

  • The opinions blogged herein represent only those of Valeria Maltoni and do not reflect those of her employer, persons or companies mentioned herein, or anyone else.