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@Tamar - there seems to be a mismatch of content and products in the marketplace. Which makes for missed opportunities on both ends.

@Carolyn Ann - two ways to stop interfering with the very product they fund (1) be the product/experience/service I want; (2) match the product/experience you fund in values, philosophy, etc. Indeed many can be famous today and not make one penny from it. A reverse of that is all those who make a ton of money to run companies (and economies) into the ground. Instead of embracing value, more often than not society embraces the perception of value.

@Joe - businesses need to be the content and marketers need to be content producers. A better question than "how do I push my message?" is "how do I provide value?"

Excellent roundup Valeria. Here's the issue...we know that consumers are using the web more to learn and be entertained...including video. The issue is that they don't want to be interrupted with advertising (especially on the web...they are more forgiving in print).

So, even cutting edge content providers (like YouTube) are going to have a hard time selling any kind of online advertising around content. As we know, it comes down to businesses needed to BE the content, instead of associating themselves AROUND the content.

Video advertising will continue to rise, but I don't think it will be booming (ever) because of this fact in online engagement.

Best
Joe

Could this be rephrased as: At what point does advertising cease to fund entertainment?

This begs a veritable barrage of questions, not least how does advertising and marketing adapt to the perception that they interfere with the very product they fund?

How do you profit from Susan Boyle? iTunes. When her contract with that talent show ends, she will probably have agents lining up. Until then, she's part and parcel of the show, and probably a massive boon to it.

We have reached the age when music stars can be famous, and not get a penny for their efforts! Which is another, more specific, rephrasing of your question.

Carolyn Ann

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