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» Twitter giornalismo e convergenzaeditoriale from Il Giornalaio
Così come era già avvenuto recentemente in seguito al terremoto in Abruzzo, la rivolta in atto in questi giorni in Iran e le censure imposte dal regime di quella nazione hanno rilanciato con prepotenza il dibattito su quello che comunemente viene chia... [Read More]

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On this topic I found very interesting this speech of Manuel Castells:
http://www.eduwilliam.com/?p=217

Ciao.

Pier Luca

I agree that we should all be judicious when we're reading "unverified" reports on Twitter an other outlets. But you can't argue that the crowd-sourced media via Youtube, Twitpic, etc, is something that CNN and the other networks simply cannot compete with. That type of media doesn't need to be verified, because we're seeing it with our own eyes. It's much like 1991 when people were glued to CNN's coverage of the Gulf War because no other network was doing anything like it. There's another changing of the guard happening now.

After spending a good portion of the day yesterday looking through unfiltered multimedia on Twitter FriendFeed, and Twubs, outlets like CNN keep looking older. Even iReport, which CNN still refers to as "amateur" video, as if we're supposed to take that into account when assessing it's validity, looks pre-packaged and downright bland compared to what we're seeing via crowdsourced outlets.

I do think new media and traditional media need to converge for all of our benefits, but right now networks are still treating social media like a vanity accessory. Those tweets scrolling on the bottom of the screen are largely useless. They need to bring the audience more into the conversation somehow, or else more are just going to keep bypassing traditional outlets.

@Daniel - I'm with you on the numbers. However, it was the small percentage on social media that prompted CNN to change its programming mix and offer more news about what's happening in Iran, news that may have long lasting ramifications for many. I also pointed out how other news organizations used their blogs to bring us information. And I did point out the issue with unfiltered truth and misinformation... The biggest point I made in the post, which PierLuca picked up on, is that we want to talk about what is happening and that is the essence of new media, something that traditional media is still having a very hard time integrating. It's not just about playing tweets at the bottom of broadcast. It's a new way of sourcing and discussing news. That is were engagement and action live.

@PierLuca - I fixed the link so that the parentheses doesn't interfere. Understanding and integrating is where we are. It seems to me that if a President can win an election by allowing his supporters to do more, perhaps instead of just watching the news, we can become more active global citizens if we feel that we can have a real impact on the outcome starting with greater awareness.

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