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On the broad implications of Web 2.0, I think Jens KH made some very important points. But your question seems personal too, so I'll speak of my personal experience.

I started blogging on a personal blog for friends and family when I moved to Thailand two years ago. Then one year ago, I started a blog meant for the public to read. Committing to writing a blog has been the catalyst for so many developments in my life over the past year. I take my writing in general much more seriously; I have connected with scores of people with complementary aspirations and interests; I've come to learn the tools that have potential to amplify the work of change agents. I feel like I am still unfolding the new possibilities opening around us.

But more than anything, I've learned that web 2.0 is just a toolkit. It presents incredible potential, but ultimately, it depends on how we use it. And I think we are very much in flux, still negotiating the spaces and capacities we're encountering. Sometimes Twitter is tiring, and feels like pointless noise, but sometimes it leads me to new collaborations or even just the ability to chat with someone on a specific topic.

When I approach these tools with intention and honesty, they fuel fulfilling outcomes. But when I approach them out of boredom or restlessness, I remain unfulfilled. I think therein lies the bottom line of web 2.0... it is what we put into it.

^ It's not so much about copying best practise as having even one big brand example where a company takes the opportunity and proves it can make these tools work well.

It feels to me like there's an awful lot of talk about how great social media could be, and not many examples of how great it's proved itself to be. Don't get me wrong - I agree that it could be great - but I just don't think that any of the old-school marketeers will buy what us believers are selling until a big brand or two blazes the trail. That's the bit that makes me sad - I feel like the guy in the corner suggesting TV whilst all my colleagues are still saying it's all about radio.

@Rod - while I think best practices help deconstruct what was done well and what can be done better and believe in the value of repeatability, we're moving more into a world where marketers will need to really know their stuff - industry, customers, content - to succeed. We're moving and evolving too fast and what is good today may be passe' tomorrow. That's why context is so important and this work needs to be so hands-on. Good thinking here and thank you for kicking off the conversation.

@Keith - I truly enjoyed your post about sales calls. It seems too simple, doesn't it? Love how you talk about the multiplier effect. I've used the term "on steroids", but I like your "bionic" more. Anything that is hard forces us to stretch or move outside our comfort zone where we operate from habit into a zone of learning... and growth. In fact, we probably learn more from the times when we get that uncomfortable feeling in our gut, than when all is well. We reach flow when we rise above the preoccupation with failing and join the experience of doing real time. Your French is spelled correctly. Awesome thinking.

@Rick - what do they say about taking things in small doses? It's true. And does what you're doing make sense to your business, growth... life? There is meat alright, it's a matter of knowing how to execute and measure. You know that!

@Je' - it's so good hearing from you. I was thinking last night as I was composing the post that it had been a while. I identify my own reasons with yours. There are so many great people I met through social media that I might not have otherwise ever met. I love this image "rubbing some ideas together and helping to create a blazing humanity". Thank you.

@Denis - of course it's just a set of tools. The promise though, the reason it was 'invented' was to help further knowledge sharing and that it does in spades.

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