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@Eric - good pick up on the "no action" part. The best at networking and selling are like that - they develop a relationship continuously and leave the door open.

@Lara - communication style and preference, too. Had he tried to call me, he would have gotten nowhere, but he didn't know that from my presentation because I never mentioned it. You make a great point in classifying the blog with in person presentation, too. Why do so many PR agencies then strike out when they pitch bloggers? It could be because they have a cookie cutter approach. When you don't know the communication style, you research it. That's why networking and experience are so important in helping make connections. The other option is to be totally honest and ask directly for what you're looking for in your own voice and style. What gets you in trouble is the pretend part more often than not.

I think one very important point that Brian touched on in his email is: understanding your audience's communication style. You mentioned this briefly in bullet #3.

Brian had a significant advantage in that he had the chance to observe you in action. As a result, he was able to garner that your communication style is conversational. His approach to connect with you was verbose and a bit like telling a story. For some, they may have stopped reading the email somewhere between the first line and the end of the first paragraph. But for you, it connected. And that equals a win.

If Brian had never had an opportunity to see you speak or to read your blog, the likelihood that he would understand your communication style would be slim to none. In such a case, you have to hinge your communication on what you understand / think your target's drivers will be and, in my opinion, keep the communication concise.

Curious to know your thoughts on this. Specifically - 'how to write an email that stands out when you don't know the person's communication style'.

Thanks for your thoughts.

I think this is a great approach but sometimes being concise can be appreciated. I think its tough to craft a "cold" email, but I have found adding value (as this person did) is helpful to you and your future presentations.

I think that a strong part of this is that there is no action item for you, but thats perfectly fine. If he reaches out in the future you would at least be open.

Its clear that not every email can result in a dialogue but it should leave the door open.

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