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» When marketing meets customer service: Say what you mean; mean what you say from thinks
Nothing can do more to ruin great marketing than lousy customer service. Heres one example why. SHARETHIS.addEntry({ title: "", url: "" });... [Read More]

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Hi Valeria,

Great post. I think what it really all comes down to is Giving Customers What They Really Want. A couple of years back I wrote a book on this subject and in my experiences and research customers really just want a company that meets and sometimes exceeds their expectations.

Things like showing up or calling when you say you're going to. Following through.

Getting the job done without making the customer's life difficult. As in, just give us the order and everything will be taken care of. Or connecting you with a real person almost immediately instead of listening to 10 minutes of dialing choices.

Being friendly by smiling or making the customer feel welcomed and warmed.

Companies that just do these simple things systematically stand head and shoulders above most.

Add to this a little dose of going above and beyond, showing your customers that you really care for them and exceeding their expectations - and not only will you have a loyal customer for life - they'll be your biggest fan and rave to all their friends about you.

Valeria, few years ago, we had a meeting with some trainers who were trying to change some of the above habits. The most memorable exercise was the follow:
they gave us a paper with some instruction written on, the first one was to carefully read the paper and follow instructions. Some of them were really weird, such as jump on the chair, etc.

The room soon became a huge mess of people acting as mad.
The happy few who read the entire paper got to the last line saying: don't do anything of the above and remained sat on their chairs.

And yes, we sometimes are to in hurry to sit and think and believe that acting will save time but it is thinking that will save time and money.

Excellent simple treatise on what not to do. The most prevalent of the seven I have seen are downgrading and complicating.

Nothing is worse then receiving one level of customer service in one place and receiving an entirely different experience somewhere else. The experience needs to be uniform...otherwise the good one won't matter.

Complicating from automation is brutal. I usually just angrily mash the # key til I get an actual person.

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