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@Beth - thank you for coming back to the conversation. I couldn't agree more on PR people needing to lead where things may be going next - by counseling, being informed, and walking the talk. Time will indeed tell.

@Steve - wow, your first time here and you make a pretty large assumption. If you note on the post, I did ask the question if PR people were involved. I realize it's probably easier to scan posts and comments, esp. when lengthy... I have a whole category labeled PR on this blog. You're welcome to it any time. Problem is that people prefer to bitch on posts where they perceive there is no solution, than join the conversation where I make recommendations. Would love to hear your thoughts on what I can do to get a better conversation going on those posts. As a matter of record, in my day job I do practice what I preach :)

Great informative comments and some interesting issues raised.

Where were the PR people? A quick thought: "Both CEOs decided to handle the news-breaking themselves with the tools at hand - and distribute the information directly to their audiences." Hm.

Did Hsieh or Bezos actually say this? Maybe I'm wrong, but I can't find any reference to them saying they alone were responsible for the choice. CEOs may lead an organisation but Hsieh and Bezos both have sizeable pr departments and senior counsel. Do we really think they operated in total isolation? Unilateral decisions?

Interesting as this discussion is, I would love to read more posts on what is right in the industry to help drive it forward rather than these issues highlighting cracks. I've tried, but there's not many around. Is it because it's easier to talk about what's wrong rather than what's right? Maybe we are guilty of too much negative spin on our own industry?

Valeria, as always you balance the conversation!

I absolutely believe that PR 2.0 will bring PR professionals back into a counsel seat versus the dreaded administrative or back-office function. Mainly because PR pros need to stop being the mouthpiece (especially in social media channels) and instead they need to focus on areas of data/analytics, trending, monitoring, connecting dots, etc. This is where the true PR pro will stand out. ;-)

"...management will not prioritize those communications when customers need them, only if it suits their purpose."

That is the danger of social media and PR 2.0! If management doesn't participate in a channel/method that *they* select, the next time out of the gate they might not fair as well (we've seen that all too often). As I said, Jeff and Tony should be joining each of the conversations on the platform *they* selected (i.e. social media). Conversations via social media fragment & they need to follow and participate in those fragmentations.

I, too, have been involved with M&As. Let's just say I don't believe everything I am told or I read. Time will tell.

Thanks Valeria!

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