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@Caroline - I'm thinking Peter weaved a good idea here that might address part of the change equation. The other, I might have touched upon it in my post tomorrow.

@Alex - indeed, 90 minutes is a good symbolic time frame. And, when lived every moment, it can be a pretty good stretch of time to make something happen.

Peter,

Your contribution to this topic is very timely as I've been thinking about change in relation to attention and time.

Pondering the relationships in what you shared here...

That doesn't mean it's not interesting, it's just not timed right for some reason".

But only for the author.

For everyone else, the 90 minutes only starts from when they needed to know it. I've found the ancient writers to be masters of perfect timing.

But this is not your point - yours is how do we continue to work in an environment of shrinking patience. In my view, its starts with presence - time is more or less a measure of change. If you change slowly or imperceptibly in the eyes of the other time tends to slow down (regardless of what the clock says).

Hence if you don't walk the talk of your brand time will run really fast and you won't have much time to fix the problem before your brand has become dust, But align the two and it becomes harder to measure change and therefore time - and you don't need to rush.

Maybe.

Spk soon

Peter

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