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As the corporate world begins to ask the important questions, like Why, How, and Who about social, a new breed of services is becoming increasingly critical to strategic success in a shifting world. And while creativity drives a campaign, strategy... [Read More]

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Valeria:

I jumped in the conversation at the last 30 minutes or so and it was very valuable for me. Thanks for moderating.

So much of what others have said here resonates with me. I believe that a fundamental shift needs to happen in many organizations. That shift starts with talking and listening to each other. It’s so basic yet vital to success. It takes time and intention.

This past year, I hired a facilitator for our staff, members and volunteers. The goal was for everyone to begin to have and speak a common language and understand the core of communications. We could not move forward without some accepted practices about human dynamics and communications. We needed to be on the same page about active and passive listening (in person or virtually), the science of our emotions, how to avoid an emotional highjack, and the science and art of a response, especially during a high emotions and low trust situation. While the business world would classify this type of education as “soft skills,” I believe it is the hard work of these soft skills that make or break an organization in today’s Web 2.0 world.

While I had not time to follow the chat live, I went through yesterday. Great insights, indeed. What strikes me the most is when we talk about corporate culture and how it is spread across the workforce.
This is a tough task for every corporation.

I suggest you to watch a video from a MCAD professor Daniel Pink. He says :don’t do things for instrumental reason, do things for fundamental reason.
Acting for instrumental reason will soon make clear any lack of transparency, any hidden goal in your action.
While acting for fundamental reason, because you think that what you do is inherently valuable, will boost the empathy of your action.

And this seems to me particularly true in the internal communication, the relation with your employees, with your first brand ambassadors.

@Amy - it looks like your comment hit home with me and many others. You are spot on, trust needs to begin with positive action and reinforcement on the inside. If the culture is stilted, if risk is abhorred, then everyone is already walking on eggshells.

@Marc - abandoning ship before even getting to the high seas is a symptom of deeper issues. The thing is that unless you are truly committed to making it work, it probably won't.

@Jason - we had a great group joining the conversation. There are several nuggets in there thanks to what everyone contributed.

@Richie - Kat's words were pure genius, I agree. We need new words to move this forward. The current language is a bit tired. Amy has the gift of simplicity, something I strive for. Thank you for offering the link.

@Tiffany - I believe in educating, coaching, and leading by example. People don't know what they don't know; we're social animals, and providing a way for them to see how others interact and collaborate is very powerful. That's sort of what we all did when we started online, isn't it?

@Aaron - thank you, and nice to meet you.

@Yvonne - there's no magic bullet. Brands don't throw content, people do. That's where we should focus. Niche is powerful with community. What is lacking is manpower and resources at the moment, I think. Only so many hours in a day and the need to focus on high priority for the business.

@Harriet - I couldn't have said it better myself.

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