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What I take away from this post more than anything is that both media publications and businesses need to ask more questions and admit what they don't know. I deal in B2B and our whitepapers would be greatly enhanced if we openly admitted what questions our surveys and research do not sufficiently answer. And then get the community to fill in the gaps.

@Rosh - there will be a time soon, when those who can write will demand to be compensated for it/ And so they should. The other day I got an email from a well-intentioned young person who was asking for a reference to someone "cheap" who could write copy that sells. That's an oxymoron, you pay for that kind of service. Why fold the tents when you could be taking things into the future of media? That attitude of defeat I fail to grasp...

@Brian - you got it, so few are looking at the online medium as something entirely different, which it is. In that sense, I would think that being hungry to get the medium and its potential to do what journalists do best would be top of mind. You're correct, there is a vacuum on page one and it's one left voluntarily open at the moment, filled with opportunity for the people with the right kind of attitude and approach. What Arianna Huffington and many other online publications has done is fill that gap. If it's true that you can write compelling copy, write it!

While I can certainly understand Rosh's perspective, something that really stands out to me is how many people who participate in social media are quick to point out the failures of the traditional print media, all the while merely dealing in a digital version of the same thing. They aggregate and redistribute content as quickly as possible in order to gain readers so they can sell ad space. The end.

Maybe, one day, originality will play a larger role in SEO tactics and the pressure will be on to deliver unique content, forcing the in-it-for-the-money shills to page 2 or more. In the meantime, I think it would be a good idea for those in the news industry who have an understanding of what is really required of a true reporter to consider applying those skills in social media right now.

Find the stories that need to be told, investigate the issues that matter, develop a network of contacts that will enable the application of true, reporting skills, and create that fresh, new content today.

Aggregated content can hold some readers and generate some conversation, but it can't hold a candle to that which is possible when your website is known for fresh, quality content. People like being close to the source. I think I want to be that source.

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