« News: NASDAQ Rolls Out Community Site | Main | Forget Competitors: in B2B Content Strategy, Context Matters »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c03bb53ef0120a6762464970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference A Story, not *the* Story:

Comments

@Kat - where to start, right? My take is crating something that makes the existing obsolete is a good way to make change happen ;)

@Christa - maybe that's why I have a hard time even talking about the great work I do I'm overly sensitive to the stories of others, and there is something to be said for experiences remaining personal, too. It's a balance we all struggle with, I think.

@Harriet - we have indeed. There are days when that is challenging to do, being totally in the moment like that. The more goal-oriented people tend to plow through things - and you if you get in the way. So far, they seem to have the upper hand in corporate America. Which may be one of the reasons why so many choose other paths - their story is not welcome.

@Christa - You are so spot-on about getting others to talk about themselves by asking the right questions. That's the best way to connect and to get to the heart of conversation - sharing and exchanging stories.
@Valeria - We've exchanged comments before about the value of the right question at the right time and the value of stories that come in all shapes and sizes. Once again, you've nailed one of the fundamental challenges many people experience in how they approach the concept of conversing with someone else. It's the inquisitiveness, the ability to genuinely be interested in what someone else has to say that will result in stronger connections, better stories and food for future thought.

Valeria, I love this. Everyone tells me I'm a good writer, and the #1 thing my sources say is "Thanks for making me look good," but the secret sauce for me IS allowing them to tell their stories. I do have a plan -- a list of questions -- but more for reference. Often the interview flows organically, and that dynamic material is where the best content comes from.

I'm moving from being the middleman, however, to showing "sources" (clients) how to tell their own stories. At the same time, though, many of those stories have to do with connections to other people.

I have to wonder if part of my clients' barrier to storytelling is: how do you capture the intimacy of a shared story/connection? Doesn't that feel like betrayal in some small way -- using a connection to promote your own self?

Your storytelling is a good example of how it is not those things. You are not a "self" promoter -- and I think at least part of our task is to show the difference between self-promotion, and value promotion.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Advisory Boards


As seen on

Social

Marketing that makes business sense


Conversations


Book Reviews


Comment Policy and Social Guidelines

  • This is my blog and not a public space. Critical discourse is welcomed. However, inappropriate comments will be deleted. See my social guidelines for reference.

Disclaimer

  • The opinions blogged herein represent only those of Valeria Maltoni and do not reflect those of her employer, persons or companies mentioned herein, or anyone else.

© Valeria Maltoni


  • This work is protected by copyright. It may be quoted and excerpted. Beyond a sentence or two, you should ask for permission before publication.

  • Conversation AgentTM

  • © 2006-2014 Valeria Maltoni.