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Great post with some very interesting replies. There are some very obvious marketing questions but you can spot them quite easily. I've personally found that a detailed question will elicit responses from 'experts' and avoid the standard marketing answers.

When you come across an interesting question it also interesting to contribute and be involved in the meni debate that ensues!

I'd add to the comments that if you do ask a question make sure that you provide timely feedback and thank people.

I could be a bit off topic but: My answers for point 10... many ad networks and agencies offer Pay-for-what-you-get solutions.

In my sales experience I noticed (sigh) how many prospects expect to do online marketing "à la carte", i.e. €10 per registration, €20 per sale, etc... It became more or less like selling/buying a kebab. And these expectations are of course reflected on so many discussions, making acceptable for them to receive an answer that involves basic maths than to understand a project on full scale.

I guess that who answers is happy to work on these basis. Personally, I am not :)

@John - I use Google Reader to syndicate the question topics I'm interested in. Automating anything is imperfect, of course, as the feed can only give you quantitative and topical information, but not qualitative. That's why we continue to rely on human filters, especially our own (no two people are exactly alike... although some assistants are remarkable in reading minds). Thank you for the kind words on the IMS09 talk. I'm working on the speaker page and always welcome testimonials by informed professionals, so feel free ;)

@Deni - perhaps it's insecurity that prompts people to embed "look how great I am" in the interaction? I'm evolving this theory that those who are prime numbers don't need to call attention to it, you figure it out by noticing that although the share the same characteristic, they are each unique (new metaphor I'm trying out for objectivity). Thank you for sharing your techniques. I'm liking the thoughtful parts a lot.

@Scott - of course it is, thank you for pointing it out. Well put!

@Lewis - since you're the one who wrote the book on LinkedIn (one of them ;) I'm glad your friend measures his results. We're not saying one shouldn't have a strategy. Of course, you should. The way the strategy is implemented determines success with everything in life. Great cooks have the same recipes / ingredients as everyone else... yet they manage to make dishes that are experiences. That's where the value is.

@Jay - interesting thought. By needing to explain in a different medium, perhaps we'd get more of the story and background.

@Rich - a friend of mine used to say "just like life". In life the question is how you show up.

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