« Twittertales, the eBook | Main | Lists, Permission, and Content Marketing »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c03bb53ef012875e05539970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference The Value of Reputation:

» Five Must-Read Posts from Last Week from Servant of Chaos
Have you noticed that the end of year activities are keeping us all busy? It certainly feels like the busy-ness of business is accelerating in the last month before year-end – and while this is normal, it feels faster, more... [Read More]

Comments

I would not call communicating effectively with stakeholders navel-gazing. But that's probably not what you meant. I grabbed the report because the categories are solid.

And I wanted to make a point. The role of public relations professional is thought of as just writing and sending out/pitching press releases. Organizations that don't understand the value of (first) doing the right thing with products, governance, etc. and then communicating it to their stakeholders as outlined stand to lose market value.

As we head into a period of increased efficiency - "learning to use less, reuse more, and find greater value in the things we have close at hand" [moreminimal.com] - our choices will be increasingly guided by reputation. Your comment is subjective. Does it mean it's not valuable?

Am I the only one who thinks that things like this are a little too navel-gazing to be of much value? I mean, seriously, the fact that they broke the key driver metric down to tenths of a percentage point? These are inherently fluid and qualitative comparisons already, as they compare brands in vastly different industries, with different cultures, different goals, serving different demographics. And it's all subjective. I guess I just feel like this kind of thing makes for good consultant reports, but little actionable intelligence. Am I wrong?

The comments to this entry are closed.

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Advisory Boards


As seen on

Social

Marketing that makes business sense


Conversations


Book Reviews


Comment Policy and Social Guidelines

  • This is my blog and not a public space. Critical discourse is welcomed. However, inappropriate comments will be deleted. See my social guidelines for reference.

Disclaimer

  • The opinions blogged herein represent only those of Valeria Maltoni and do not reflect those of her employer, persons or companies mentioned herein, or anyone else.

© Valeria Maltoni


  • This work is protected by copyright. It may be quoted and excerpted. Beyond a sentence or two, you should ask for permission before publication.

  • Conversation AgentTM

  • © 2006-2014 Valeria Maltoni.