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Thank you for this inspiring post.

It reminds me that in order to get somewhere you have to work and put brick by brick and that every effort you do matters. I see that some people want overnight success, but dont look into the details and the work put to get there.

As they say "Rome wasn't build in day"

@David - we're barely scratching the surface on actual conversation online. I was on a a train last night and was struck by the similarities of intent we seek to borrow from the real world online. Getting to know each other, testing the waters on potential synergies, the curiosity about each other... all of these dynamics can be ignited through the wise use of content. In fact, I'm thinking content is the equivalent of non verbals online. The signals we make to others on whether we're open to conversation and being engaged or if we want to continue reading our book (broadcast our own message) in peace.

@Aaron - it was Seth, yes. Thank you for stopping by.

@Coree - you do know better, I agree with you ;) This is a collective kick in the butt for sure. We're all so focused on producing quality content, that often we miss the conversation party altogether. Then there's the issue of being moderate vs. taking a definite stand. Although many of us do stake a stand, we don't do it as forcefully and it often gets lost in the business. But I don't advocate being cutting and controversial for its own sake or just to get dozens of comments... that, too is not conversation.

@Brian - yeah, in the real world nothing happens overnight, does it? It's a daily conquest, something we work towards, or to use a sailing analogy, we tuck into.

I love the idea of inch by inch. To me, it speaks to being real. Be yourself (since you should believe in what you're selling), but don't focus on yourself. It's like writing for your audience, but rather than just writing what you think your audience would like, engage them and find out what they need, then fill that need in the way they want it filled.

Some people want ice cream, but some people want milkshakes. Still other people just want a glass of milk. By being a part of the audience (though serving), it's possible to make sure there is just enough milk and ice cream around to make everybody happy.

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