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Valeria, I still think that the utmost problem is
"1. you don't have a clearly defined goal, therefore you don't know where you're going"

You can change your language, get to understand customer, however, if there are no set goals and measurements defined - no matter how great a PR piece is, it won't get a company anywhere.

I personally has made this mistake several times, before it hit me - plan ahead and know what you are aiming at :)

@Jon - filler words, aren't they? It's so easy to seek security in them. News announcements is one place where they get inserted. Sell sheets, Web copy, other marketing materials are also filled with them. Good copy of any kind gets to the point quickly and persuasively from the reader's point of view.

@Tom - I'm fairly familiar with a lot of work on weasel or filler words. I'm a linguist and have remained passionate about languages and human expression over the years. Thank you for the many links to your posts.

Here's another post on jargon, including data from David Meerman Scott who analyzed 711,123 press releases distributed during 2008 by North American companies through Business Wire, Marketwire, GlobeNewswire, and PR Newswire. He filtered for 325 gobbledygook phrases and issued a report. The top 10: innovate, pleased to, unique, focused on, leading provider, commitment, partnership, new and improved, leverage, and 120 percent. Fun stuff!

http://www.gablepr.com/blog/2009/04/17/pr-jargon-train-keeps-rolling-and-gaining-speed/

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