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Valeria,

A darkish thought - have corporations been hijacked by certain professions and transformed into vehicles for their continued relevance ?

How is it then, that despite these "corrupting influences" by and large corporations still have healthy momentum, direction and pay their bills. Perhaps the 20th century love affair with marketing has blinded us to undiscovered forces at play - corporations are wonderful mystery - a lightish thought.

As an aside,is there etiquette on posting multiple comments ?

Peter

In reading your thoughts on marketing and preservation and need I'm also thinking about many lawyers - the ambulance chasers come to mind - who do quite the same thing. And MBA graduates, and HR people...

To me there are types of people who create a crisis to then be seen (photo/career opp) solving it. I've encountered quite a few in my career.

Yes, if it's true that many people are going nowhere, that holds true for many corporations as well.

Indeed a pleasure.

"We're terrible customers and we bring that attitude in organizations as sellers."

I know that we are bad at selling - I'm just not sure how bad it is. I've been trying to work out how much of what we tell companies is wrong with them is motivated by "our" need to have something to sell to them.

For example, I've been thinking about marketing. To what extent are marketing ideas motivated by self preservation. There seems no other profession where the required tools, knowledge and skill are so aligned with ensuring the professions continued popularity and relevance. I'm not saying it's intentional but that marketers may be hopelessly compromised by their own discipline.

To put it another way, marketers create the demand for their own services (regardless of the need - afterall need is seldom a pre-condition of a sale).

I'm not saying this is bad, I just wonder to what extent we need to discount their claims when analysing just how bad companies are.

"To me, a conversation is also about holding many points of view in consideration and appreciation, seeing the people who bring them forth as humans, and moving our own thinking or being moved to evolve it of our own choosing."

Yes - but does this extends to corporations also. Should we hold corporations to the standard of humanity or super humanity (as was kind of suggested a couple of days ago ). By the way, I don't know how much choice we have over the timing of the penny dropping - both as humans and as part of corporations.

A pleasure to stop by.

Peter

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