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Funny that once something is determined to be a "crisis", it could have been prevented much sooner and without much effort.

I agree that a contingency plan (almost in the same idea as a DR/BCP for business operations) must be created and known by those responsible for handling it.

The more transparent business becomes and is demanded so by customers, the more crisis management in social media will be a must have.

Enjoyed the piece Valeria.

Paul, I don't think you get it. Or, at the very least, you're unfamiliar with the broader scope of Valeria's work, which is all about the employee empowerment and authentic one-on-one interaction you champion.

But if you think there's no value in institutional response, you're living in a dream world. We need look no further than BP's self-immolation to see this. Institutional responses are quoted, set tone for the rank-and-file, and are useful to both institution and the public at large -- if conceived as more than propaganda.

You're entirely correct that message control is an unlamented anachronism in the age of social media. Modern communication is a wildfire. Frankly, I'm comfortable with that.

But Valeria's piece embraces more than message. It's about forming effective response -- from advance risk assessment to problem-solving to communication (both internal and public).

This is responsible management, a process which has not been fundamentally changed by social media. It is, however, based on authentic communication, something which must exist long before a crisis if an institution plans to weather the fast-moving storms which cross our digital landscape.

@Alexis - thanks for stopping by.

@Paul - first off, would you say that a business should not align with what is good for its community? That's what mitigating risk means. Do you have a different understanding? It sounds like you might so by all means, enlighten me. If you want people to have a good opinion of you, your behavior needs to be good. Yup, you need to align what your business is about with what the community wants and needs. Which incidentally means that to mitigate a disaster you need to think through how you conduct your business on the get go. I agree that you need to treat people well; common sense is not all that common? The role of public relations managers is an important one. I would not want someone with no qualifications and training to build a bridge, to just enable the folks who want to build one to do it, would you? The risk of people participating without understanding the issues is to those people as much if not more than to the company. I don't want to control people, I want to help them be more effective. Big difference. You seem to want to take it out on me personally because I believe that education and information/knowledge should be shared. I've got news for you, social media didn't invent decency and respect of the other. They existed before. However, it seems to me that we could use a bit more critical thinking and parsing before writing critically.

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