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As much as I enjoy watching Fast Company's ongoing love affair with Ashton unfold like a soap opera romance, someone at the magazine needs to realize that Ashton, as cool and pretty and smart as he may be, is not the king of Social Media. He's simply a popular celebrity on Twitter who may have found a way to profit from it. That's really about it.

But you know, the fact that Fast Company doesn't understand this illustrates the magazine's confusion when it comes to understanding the difference between popularity and influence, and even between reach and action.

I dug Fast Company a lot more back in the day. I still like it now, a lot, but I don't love it like I used to. Great writing is one thing, but relevance comes from understanding the subjects you write about (or turn into projects) thoroughly. Fast Company's relevance just took another hit with this, and that makes me sad.

Valeria, I can say this... YOU had true influence in 2000 (and still do, of course). How do I know this? Because it was in 2000 when you and I first met via "Company of Friends." The Fast Company offline 'social' network. People trusted that you brought us all together for a common purpose and that we could all make a difference somehow...even in small ways.

You influenced me to get involved, to meet new people, to truly understand what networking was about and why it was SO very important. Something I would have never done on my own back then.

Ten years later, you still influence me. Fast Company, not so much. You're right, they played to egos. Customers don't care about ego. In fact, that's the first thing that a customer will 'fire' you for. An ego doesn't help them solve a problem that may be critical to their business, in fact it usually has the opposite effect.

Thanks for the reminder of what real influence is.

honestly, i think fast company thrives because it has great content. End of story. ;)

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