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Thanks for this post, timed for my edification today - after a meeting with some ignorant colleagues who I have to get on the train (or it'll never leave the station). I'm usually pretty resourceful, but cannot employ some methods usually at my disposal because of the politics involved. Switch is in my reading pile - and you've jumped it to the top now.

@Elmar - for some strange reason, everyone prefers to focus on what is wrong vs. what works. Lots of energy spent trying to fix instead of expanding good things...

@Ben - which is a lesson I hope everyone is paying attention to. Kudos to you for understanding that we are our first audience. It's an internal conversation in many ways.

@Brian - this book was even better than the previous one they wrote, and it's been more helpful to me in my work.

@Patrick - the whole field of appreciative inquiry is about studying what works. I was lucky to be exposed to it in my early community facilitation days. This is better than Made to Stick (to me anyway). Given how smart you are about this kind of thinking, you will get a lot out of it, too.

Years ago a creative consultant said, "focusing on what's working will speed the process." It's stuck with me ever since. It seems human nature wants to believe the worst - particularly about ourselves. It's so important to operate from a position of strength - acknowledge your weaknesses but don't dwell on them - such negative emotions feed the downward spiral.

Thanks for the summary - take 2; I've resisted this book. Loved Made to Stick but wasn't sure this one was necessary. Seems it is!

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