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@Kevin - that is a scary thought about the obituary.

@Gabriele - alas, we're experiencing gaper delays on that... people are fascinated with train wrecks, accidents, and the like more than with something that could benefit them.

@Mack - I took a whole series of photos at the museum. If that keeps you coming back, I will use them in posts ;) You remind me of an exercise my mother did as part of sales training many years ago, where people had to keep each other interested in a story by passing it on to the next person in a chain. The final story was nothing like the original one. Each person had added flavor and color to it. Good thoughts on the reverse effect, too. I had not thought about it in that light. Thank you.

Love the painting, Valeria ;)

I think we as humans have a natural tendency to add a 'spin' on a story that will make the story likely to be more interesting to the person we are talking to. And I think we (speaking in general) do this for selfish reasons, we want to be seen as passing on that 'juicy bit of gossip' so others will pass it along and be excited about hearing the story we are sharing.

I think what you can find in a digital context is that as more people become irritated or outraged, it's easy for the next person to be outraged as well. Take the Motrins Moms fiasco. After several hours people started complaining that many people were going too far and getting too upset about a story that they didn't think was that big of a deal.

An interesting discussion to consider, either way.

That being true, the value of the "original content" acquires even more importance. If everyone is going to cite it from time to time, it's vital that you put the most importance in making it memorable in first place.

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