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Valeria, WOOT is one of my favorite examples, I love reading the copy especially the wine info. One thing I've noticed is that sites that are less controversial or that "sell" humor can get away with more. So a Despair.com or Someecards.com can get more creative than some businesses feeling the need to play it safe. FWIW.

It's often not just about what you write but how you write it. From experience I notice that stuff that is presented in a funny way has got a lot more of attention from the average reader.
Even the most serious of things can be presented in a funny way, with some exceptions of course.
The first example of a website that is sticking in my mind since the first time I saw it is the Sofa website ( http://www.madebysofa.com/ ), presenting for example their own team in a fun way, even adding the office cat in their roster.
If I still remember it after so much time, it really means something.

@Christina - I chose examples that show passion and love for whatever the organization does. I like it when a brand (or person) is unapologetic about who they are. I focused on copy on purpose. I think design and usability do have a strong role in making it pop, but ultimately what we respond to is a human being talking with us. And of course, the experience we have with that product and brand. Good questions on interactivity. I'll mull over them.

@Brian - it was an unfair question without context. Thought I'd give it a shot anyway to see what came up, and I was pleased with the (RED) referral. You're talking about demonstrated intent as well, here. That's interesting.

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