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In my business reality, content creation takes a good chunk of time in the form of semi-promotional material wrapped around projects to leverage on that in order to convince a potential client or whatnot. Content creation in the shape of blog posts or interesting articles to publish here and there is given priority regarding to our social media strategy, but I admit we're still in the process of getting on top of that, since the general perception is that of a "less valuable" activity than actually writing projects. A justifiable shame.

Regarding "content type", for sure your blog falls in the category of "content you need a full awake brain to read and understand", which is both a good and bad thing. Good 'cause it means it's very valuable stuff, bad 'cause it of course attracts less people than a cookie-cutter blog could - but in the end, that's exactly what you want out of this, I presume.
I tend to comment here just if I really really have something to add to it, otherwise I prefer to just read. Nobody likes to have "Good post, keep on the quality content" comments clogging your stream without any value added to it.

I've been thinking about this a lot lately. Both from the perspective of the content I read, like this blog, as well as the need in our company to create meaningful content that's going to get the attention of the prospects we seek. And hold it.

It's a job that's getting tougher. I find myself frustrated that I can't read, digest and transform into action all the content I'd like. I have too many interests. I'm too curious and want to absorb.

And then I need to pull away - and do some of that manual labor in the form of home renovation projects. After a week with content and email and social media, it's incredibly refreshing to pull away. Do something primitive.

It's also this challenge that excites me to push our team into creating better interactions. To make each communication matter. Rather than just another email. Sure we have a long way to go, but the journey is half the reward.

@Tom - there are many who think automation is a good idea because they don't have the time or don't want to pay someone to do that. As we know, automation is flawed (e.g., sentiment analysis, scores that define influence, etc.). It can help with the process and work flow, and it will not rival human empathy and ability to adapt and build context.

@Alexandra - your job is making you smarter about filtering information, which then continues to add to the value you bring to the table in terms of understanding what's out there and how it can be channeled and harnessed. As I just wrote in response to Tom, I agree with you, automation is not the sole answer. Also because machines and software do not see opportunity that is non linear and that's where it usually resides.

@Brian - you gave me a big smile with your comment about remembering posts. We're alike in that respect, I usually stun people when they realize I was paying attention to them, their ideas, etc. It's a really useful trait to have, and it can definitely be learned. However, so many are just so into themselves that they cannot even imagine what that looks like. And I'm not saying it as a criticism, it's an observation and a manifestation of the influences in their lives. It's taken me a long time to figure it out, and now I accept it. Which is what makes the concept of empowering so difficult for most to understand. Businesses do need to worry about content, filters, and influence, because they often cannot get to "empowering": it's too daunting and squishy a concept, especially when it's an entity driving the bus.

@Dane - and we play into that by recommending one edit down, make things pity, etc. I still take the time to read in long form, maybe because that's how I was brought up. It helps me expand my thinking and see things from different points of view that are not mine. And I certainly don't play into the trend with this blog. I find that when we ask more of ourselves, we stretch.

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