« 3 Books on Leadership, a Vision of Life as Play, and Acting on What Matters | Main | Shady Link Building Tactics Could Damage You »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c03bb53ef0148c71283e4970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Your Site is not a Popular Destination:

Comments

@Leo - strangely enough, I was talked to like I was an idiot by a telemarketing rep representing the company I was looking to reach on the phone when I finally got connected after two hang ups and one 60-minute hold. Organizations are rushing to social media without understanding that all good will in customer conversations is wiped out by aggressive marketing tactics. Lack of utility on the site snowballed what this company's marketing group arranged as a waste of my time. The whole system needs a reboot.

@Brian - in my case I opted in Apple products because they are easier to use for what I need to get done. Simple. Microsoft has been the master at locking people into their systems, except for their stuff was more ubiquitous. There are still plenty of marketers, and businesses, as Leo said in his comment, who don't think through the consequences of bland sites, products, and business practices. Shocked that you had not seen that post. I must have hidden it really well.

@Judy - sometimes I forget to put what I've written before in future posts. Indeed, I am a big fan of building your own platform vs. sharecropping (it was in the title of another post where I wrote about that specific issue). Thank you for sharing the resource.

Agree to all of the above!

And, Valeria, you didn't touch upon the fact that so many organizations are devoting a lot of their online resources (money and staff) to developing third-party-owned company Facebook pages, rather than investing in their 100 per cent owned real estate space (websites and/or blogs).

Did you have a chance to listen to (my good friend and colleague) Ira Basen's recent one-hour CBC Radio documentary on search? (Engineering Search: The story of the algorithm that changed the world). Although it was a general interest documentary (suitable for the Sunday Edition's broad audience demographics), the ah-ha moment for me (as a PR practitioner) was a comment by Rebecca Lieb (vice president at Econsultancy and author of the book, The Truth about Search Engine Optimization). Rebecca talks about a client who was in the business of lending money. Staff were convinced that the company website should focus on "lendor." She convinced them that the average person would do a search for "borrowing money."

The end copy focused on what the end-user wanted, rather than what the organization was about.

(You can still listen to the documentary, either online in its entirety, or as a podcast download, with some of the original music stripped out and the introduction changed slightly.)

Two sides of a coin:

I sympathize with your customer service frustration, Valeria. I got an (unrequested) iPod Touch for Xmas and all the required steps to set it up - mandatory iTunes account, mandatory credit card/billing informtion to create the account, mandatory this, that, and the other - mean I will be using it to stream Pandora on an old stereo in the garage while working on the car and not much else. Apple's forcing customers through the front door under the premise of "convenience" still has me considering quietly listing the thing on Craigslist so I can get something else. I digress.

On the other side of the coin, had you not been inspired to posit these thoughts, I might have indefinitely missed the Ducati post, which I have no bookmarked for easy reference. This is exactly what we're trying to do. Rather than showing a product, we're showing people their potential. Once that hits critical mass...

Oh yeah. 2011 is going to be great. :)

The comments to this entry are closed.

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Advisory Boards


As seen on

Social

Marketing that makes business sense


Conversations


Book Reviews


Comment Policy and Social Guidelines

  • This is my blog and not a public space. Critical discourse is welcomed. However, inappropriate comments will be deleted. See my social guidelines for reference.

Disclaimer

  • The opinions blogged herein represent only those of Valeria Maltoni and do not reflect those of her employer, persons or companies mentioned herein, or anyone else.