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Valeria, I am happy to see your focus here. I just wrote a post on the "ROI of Content Marketing" because I know that's going to be the next demand from corporations.

I don't think content is taken seriously yet (as a business driver), although folks like Ann Handley, CC Chapman, Joe Pulizzi, John Blossom and you (of course) are working diligently to create its rightful place within marketing, communications, PR, etc.

Content is not easy to create. It's time consuming and needs to be relevant, timely, etc. to be effective. Planning and strategy are key. And as we know, marketers are doing a bang up job with long-term strategy and customer relationships.

It's amazing to me how "free" is the currency of the social media marketplace (for one) and yet there is so little respect or ROI for it. (Actually I am not amazed. People always want something for nothing.)

Taylor said it much more eloquently, but here are my thoughts.

"Pay for" content does a few things...

1) It separates the serious from the players
2) It creates attention & focus (because people want their money's worth -- which is *their* part of the bargain to uphold)
3) It creates ROI

That said, I don't think we should confuse "pay for" content with "gated" content. I would rather pay cash for content (with no other strings attached) then pay the cost of giving away my email address only to be accosted by sales and business development people.

Cheers,
Beth Harte
@bethharte

honestly, Rebecca, finding markets as individuals has become a necessity. When I had a corporate job, it was easier to be so generous on a daily basis.

First it was paying for side products, or anything else to monetize your exposure (speeches, press, e-books, etc), and now there is a proliferation of paid newsletters (letterly.net). I launched my paid blog about a month ago and think I am the first blog by an individual author that charges for quality content (not a newsletter or e-book or member section). I don't think everyone should charge, but with the devolution of content, it will be interesting to see how paid content evolves.

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