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A couple of simple examples:

http://bit.ly/interactiveinfo
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2009/07/31/business/20080801-metrics-graphic.html
http://benfry.com/traces/
http://visualization.geblogs.com/visualization/appliances/
http://www.boxofficequant.com/100-years-of-set-locations/full_screen.htm

They are expensive to produce, which is why we see so few of them. The Newsweek infographic linked in the post is a decent example of being able to interact with information. I took a screen shot of one of the cross references to use as image. If you go to the site, you will be able to see different combinations. I liked being having the option to play with them.

You know, I hadn't really realized this until now. Pretty much every infographic I've seen recently has been 2-dimensional; in handout or poster format. And yeah, most of them are just numbers and clever icons.

Who woulda thunk?

I think you're onto something here, Valeria. I'd be interested in some examples of betters, too.

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