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Two thoughts - one short and one longer

"Everyone gets why you are saying something"

This reminded me of a line from Orwell's essay Politics and the English Language "The great enemy of clear language is insincerity".


"How you say it makes the difference between connection and collision."

For me, a collision is just a connection with impact. A bit like a throne is a bench covered in velvet ( lovely quote from Bonaparte). It's all about the meaning.

I do agree how we say something is important. But how do I communicate an idea that the listener has no experience of and no word. I can say un chien and, yes, with a little bit of self conscious inflection the french listener recognises a dog.

"Your imperfect words said the right way get the message across" but only if the other has a word for dog. If the other has no word for dog, I have a real problem unless I can speak clearly with precision and patience.

Of course, I'm not asking about dogs but fresh ideas. How do we have "new" conversations when words are failing us and clarity is the first victim of the race to publish?





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