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Yes, yes, yes, and yes. Three simple, yet effective ideas, plus an Aston Martin used to depict competitive advantage, after all.

1. What is the problem? The customer is not satisfied. Why is the customer not satisfied? Record (and track) the reason given, make the customer happy, advance.

Not to say process isn't important, as process is the foundation of consistency, but the process should be so exceedingly simple that anyone in the organization can adapt it to quickly - and creatively - solve almost any problem.

2. Track the frequency of reported customer complaints. Then ACTUALLY REDUCE THEM. Share the data with the organization, with the world, encourage staff and customers alike to offer ideas toward the common goal of exceeding customer expectations.

Large companies have the supply chain, resources, and tools to develop and bring almost anything to market. I'm waiting for the first company built on a model of engage the market to collaboratively design any product. Local Motors (http://local-motors.com comes closer than anyone else I know of, though they still specialize in vehicles.)

3. It's Blogging 101: Think, Do, Write.

This week is off to a great start, Valeria. These simple ideas are supremely actionable.

Would your customers tell their friends you provide exceptionally good service? Ask me about T-mobile, or Pandora, or Mitsubishi. Would your staff tell you what they do for a living every day on-the-clock matters? Would the average Joe on the street have any idea who you are?

It's a sense of direction, not a roadmap. Love it.

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