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"that businesses need to build incentives for everyday risk taking."

I do hope this person works for my client's competitors.

When did it start? Not sure. When does it stop? When the conversation changes.

You're right on focus. Not a yes/no. But which is the more useful insight?

Happy first post day.

Peter


I've been thinking about this "Sure you've got to consider the audience - but neither is really fighting for the endurance, strength and resilience of the corporation. They're fighting for lower prices and higher pay cheques."

Did it start that way? I posed a question on Twitter today and got a response from someone at a PR agency (that was implicated in some shady defamation publicity with big players recently - goes to context) that businesses need to build incentives for everyday risk taking. Why? Why isn't the culture about keeping promises? Who sets the pace? Is it the employees? Customers? Is it not the business itself?

"In this age the customer is focused on you." Or are they focused on themselves? Not a yes/no answer. Just additional information.

it also requires true knowledge of the business. I worked on the client side for 20+ years, and I must say the agencies that were willing to learn or at least get to know their client's business were few and very far between... one even threw me under the bus because of it, their champion and main contact. How stupid.

I think marketing is business so it must be first and foremost business-centric. Great copy will not save a company that is not trading on its promises. Then yes, when that is in place, it must endeavor to constantly remind customers what the business is about.

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